Sunday, May 31, 2020

Timogue Castle, County Laois


Timogue Castle, County Laois

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

The 1st edition of the Ordnance Survey map marks the site of a castle in a plot on the south side of the road from Timogue Church of Ireland church. The site of the castle is presently (August 2019) occupied by the ruins of Timogue creamery. No surface remains of what looks like a castle survives. The creamery is surrounded by a stone wall of uncertain date which could be interpreted as the bawn wall around a medieval or early modern castle. A 15th/16th century tower house at Kilmacow in the barony of Kinnatalloon, County Cork, existed in 1746 but had disappeared a few years later with the site now (2019) an empty field. A nearby three storey house (Springdale House) was built about 1750 and the house owner suggested that the tower house was used as an easy quarry for stone to build the new house.[1] At Timogue there is a late 18th century corn mill located just a few hundred feet south of the castle site and the supposed castle may also have been used as an easy quarry of stones to build the mill. Therefore the type and form of the castle cannot be easily determined or when it was built or what remodelling was done to it over the centuries.

The possible bawn wall of the castle

The name of Timogue

The small parish of Timogue lies sandwiched between the two large parishes of Stradbally to the north-east and Timahoe to the south-west. Its name is said to derive from a church built by St. Maedoc of Ferns and so called teach Maedoc. Other writers discount this and say the name comes from the Anglo-Norman family of Madoc who held it in the 13th century. In the 1290s Meyler Madok was chief serjeant of Leys (Laois).[2] The location of the parish church across the road from the medieval Timogue castle would support the latter explanation for the parish name. Where a medieval castle is built beside a medieval church it is more usually the case that the castle was built first and the church built later as a chapel for the castle that later was elevated into a parish church. The early octagonal medieval limestone font shows Timogue to be a parish church as only such a church was allowed to have a font.[3]

Timogue in medieval times

In the 1170s Meiler fitz Henry was granted the cantred of Leys by Richard de Clare ‘Strongbow’ and built a castle near Timahoe. Shortly before 1202 Meiler fitz Henry granted some of the churches in his cantred to the new priory of Great Connell. Other churches, like at Timogue were outside this grant. Paul MacCotter suggested that Timogue was already church land and so outside Meiler’s control.[4] Later records show that Timogue parish was held by the Cistercian house of Abbeyleix.[5] Conner O More founded Abbeyleix in 1184 possibly as a reaction to Meyler fitz Henry building a castle at the old religious centre of Timahoe.[6] It is possible therefore that Timogue parish was granted to Abbeyleix sometime between 1184 and 1202.

De la Zouch family at Timogue

In the second half of the thirteenth century Timogue was acquired by the de la Zouch family. Alan de la Zouch, or more likely his father Roger de la Zouch, could have acquired Timogue and Morett from his cousin, Alan de la Zouch was the son and heir of Roger de la Zouch and in 1288 succeeded to his father’s Irish property.[7] William de la Zouch of Haryngworth, who in 1298 acquired a share of Laois from his mother, Melicent Cantilupe, daughter of William Cantilupe and granddaughter of Eva Marshal (daughter and co-heiress of William Marshal).[8] Although this line of acquisition is possible it is more likely that Roger de la Zouch got Timogue and Morett from his marriage to Ela Longespee and her inheritance from Walter de Ridelisford.

Roger de la Zouch was the husband of Ela de Longespee, daughter of Stephen de Longespee, seneschal of Gascony and justiciar of Ireland, by his wife Emeline (widow of Hugh de Lacy, Earl of Ulster), daughter and co-heir of Walter de Ridelisford.[9] Another daughter of Stephen de Longespee was Emelina de Longespee who quitclaimed Timogue. She was the second wife of Maurice Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald and mother of Juliana Fitzgerald (wife of Thomas de Clare).[10]

De Ridelisford at Timogue

In 1247 Walter de Ridelisford held Castledermot and Kilkea from Roger de Mortimer, the new lord of Leix.[11] But it is unknown if Walter de Ridelisford held Timogue and Morett and the properties passed down to Alan de la Zouch by marriage or Roger de la Zouch had acquired the property by other means. In 1540 the Crutched Friars of Castledermot (founded by Walter de Ridelisford) claimed £4 of tithes from Timogue parish but couldn’t collect as the land was under O’More control.[12]

The creamery at Timogue on the possible site of the castle

Fitzgerald family at Timogue

In April 1298 John Fitzgerald (Baron of Offaly), son of Thomas Fitzgerald, gave Emelina de Longespee peaceful possession of the manor of Maynooth in return for John having peaceful possession of the manors of Timogue, Morett and St. Fintan’s.[13] Sometime between 1298 and 1312 Alan de la Zouch made a grant to John Fitzgerald of the castle and lands of Timogue (Taghmodoc) along with the castle and lands of Morett.[14] At about the same time of 1298 Emelina de Longespee quitclaimed any rights she had on Timogue, Morett and St. Fintan’s to John Fitzgerald. Jordan de Coventry was named as Emelina’s attorney to give seisin of Timogue manor to John Fitzgerald.[15] In February 1302 King Edward granted John Fitzgerald free warren in numerous properties in Ireland including Tathmothoc and Ballyfugnon in County Carlow.[16] By the time Alan de la Zouch died in 1314 he had disposed of all his Irish property.[17]

Timogue in the sixteenth century

In the Kildare rental of 1518 the Earl of Kildare possessed some property rights in Timogue but was also subject to expenses for the same property. The Earl paid half the tithes of Timogue in support of the vicarage by an indenture made on 20th February 1517 between Donagh, abbot of Abbeyleix, and the Earl of Kildare. In 1518 the Earl had the advowson, nomination and right of presentation for the rectory and vicarage of Timogue.[18] In 1518 the Earl’s manor of Timogue, known as the lordship of Taghmooghe, contained the lands of Ballyanlia, Ballyantyskiyn, Bally Conlyn, Ballyprior, Bealatha Cuyllean, Cloyth an puka, Curragh, Inchenaleakaghe, Killfyacla, Neall beag and Neaymneagha.[19]
An early folklore story of Timogue castle recounts the property as belonging to Fergus O’Kelly of Timogue and Luggacurren in the region of Farran-O’Kelly. Fergus O’Kelly had an only child and heiress named Ellinor who married Gerald Fitzgerald, 11th Earl of Kildare. Their son Gerald Fitzgerald was born at Timogue castle in 1546.[20] This story sounds good but only for the fact that the 11th Earl of Kildare fled Ireland for Europe in March 1540 and didn’t return England until 1549 and to Ireland until November 1555.[21] Although the Earl was associated with womanising it would be difficult to fit the birth of Gerald Fitzgerald of Timogue into the flight of the Earl. The 11th Earl of Kildare had only one officially wife, Mabel Browne, daughter of Sir Anthony Browne, who he married in May 1554.[22]

The Earldom of Kildare was seized by the government after the Earl left and only returned piece meal after he was restored as Earl of Kildare and Baron of Offaly in May 1554. Interestingly although Morett is listed among the confiscated property of the Earl of Kildare in the 1540s Timogue is not mentioned.[23] In 1564 the Earl of Kildare was restored to the manor of Timogue in Ferann O’Kelly. The rectory and vicarage of Timogue was restored in 1568.[24]

In 1584 Gerald the Younger received a lease of 101 years from his father of 2,745 acres in Queens County (County Laois) including Moret castle, Timogue castle, Luggacurren, Ballyprior, Allybeg and other places.[25] In 1585 Gerald the Younger married Margaret Bowen, eldest daughter of Robert Bowen of Ballyadams castle. In 1600 Gerald the Younger was murdered by a member of the O’More family of Laois and a memorial lies to his memory in Timogue church.[26]

Location map

Timogue in the seventeenth century

Gerald Fitzgerald the Younger left two sons and three daughters. The second son, William Fitzgerald, was granted Timogue castle and lived there until his death in 1627 without issue when the property reverted to his elder brother Gerald Fitzgerald of Moret castle. This Gerald was known as Gearoid Garrultagh-buy (Gerald of the yellow hair) and in 1637 was High Sheriff of Queen’s County. Gerald Fitzgerald joined the Irish side in the 1641 Rebellion and had his estates confiscated when the English side won the war in 1653. Gerald Fitzgerald died in 1667 and was buried at Timogue.[27]

During the Interregnum the Commonwealth government leased Timogue castle to Sir William Whelan.[28] At the Court of Claims in 1663 Gerald Fitzgerald said that he had the manor of Timogue with its lands of Ballinreskin, Ballyprior, Ballycullen, Corragh, Culine, Fallibeg, Inshenallogh and Meanagh in Timogue parish from his mother, Margaret as administrator of her husband, Gerald Fitzgerald the Younger. Margaret had Timogue by the lease of 101 years made in 1584 in which she and her husband paid the Earl of Kildare ten pounds for Timogue during the Earl’s life and five pounds thereafter per year. But Gerald Fitzgerald’s claim for restoration of Timogue along with Morett and Shangenagh was dismissed as during the war Gerald manufactured pikes and held guns at his residence at the start of the Rebellion and his wife entertains rebels there.[29] It was not made clear if this residence was at Morett or Timogue.

In 1660 Benjamin Worsley and John Rawlins were the tituladoe (or chief) persons at Timogue which then had 8 English taxpayers and 35 Irish taxpayers.[30] The later history of Timogue castle is uncertain.

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[2] Mills, J. (ed.), Calendar of the Justice Rolls of Ireland, 1295-1303 (Dublin, 1905), pp. 169, 170
[3] Kennedy, J., The Monastic Heritage & Folklore of County Laois (Roscrea, 2003), pp. 139, 140
[4] MacCotter, P., Medieval Ireland: Territorial, Political and Economic Divisions (Dublin, 2008), pp. 33, 35
[5] Fuller, A.P. (ed.), Calendar of entries in the Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland: papal letters, volume X, 1513-1521, Leo X, Lateran Registers, part one (Dublin, 2005), no.  141
[6] Gwynn, A., & Hadcock, R.N., Medieval Religious Houses Ireland (Blackrock, 1988), p. 124; Stalley, R., The Cistercian Monasteries of Ireland (Yale University, 1987), p. 241; Orpen, G.H., Ireland under the Normans 1169-1333 (Dublin, 2005), vol. II, p. 65
[7] Sweetman, H.S. (ed.), Calendar of Documents relating to Ireland (London, 1879, reprint Liechtenstein, 1974), vol. III (1285-1292), no. 543
[8] Cockage, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. XII/2, p. 937, 938
[9] The Complete Peerage (), vol. XII/2, p. 935
[10] Orpen, G.H., Ireland under the Normans 1169-1333 (Dublin, 2005), p. 499
[11] Orpen, G.H., Ireland under the Normans 1169-1333 (Dublin, 2005), vol. III, p. 104
[12] Gwynn, A., & Hadcock, R.N., Medieval Religious Houses Ireland (Blackrock, 1988), p. 211; White, N.B. (ed.), Extents of Irish Monastic Possessions, 1540-1541 (Dublin, 1943), p. 169
[13] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), The Red Book of the Earls of Kildare (Dublin, 1964), no. 69
[14] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), The Red Book of the Earls of Kildare (Dublin, 1964), nos. 80, 81
[15] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), The Red Book of the Earls of Kildare (Dublin, 1964), nos. 82, 84
[16] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), The Red Book of the Earls of Kildare (Dublin, 1964), no. 35
[17] Sharp, J.E.E.S. (ed.), Calendar of Inquisitions Post Mortem (London, 1908, reprint Liechtenstein, 1973), vol. V, no. 458
[18] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), Crown surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare rental begun in 1518 (Dublin, 1992), pp. 235, 260, 278
[19] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), Crown surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare rental begun in 1518 (Dublin, 1992), p. 287
[20] Dix, M.L., ‘The Fitzgerald’s of Queen’s County’, in Patrick Meehan (ed.), The Laois Millennium (Portlaoise, 2000), pp. 29-47, at p. 29
[21] Carey, V.P., Surviving the Tudors ‘Wizard’ Earl of Kildare and English Rule in Ireland, 1537-1586 (Dublin, 2002), pp. 49, 53, 59
[22] Cockage, The Complete Peerage (Gloucester, 1987), vol. VII, p. 239
[23] Mac Niocaill, G. (ed.), Crown surveys of Lands 1540-41 with the Kildare rental begun in 1518 (Dublin, 1992), p. 171
[24] 57, , 223
[25] Dix, M.L., ‘The Fitzgerald’s of Queen’s County’, in Patrick Meehan (ed.), The Laois Millennium (Portlaoise, 2000), pp. 29-47, at p. 29; Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 362. Moret was already leased to Richard Fitzgerald in 1584 and the 101 years were not to commence until the expiration of Richard’s lease. Timogue was held by a separate lease in 1584 and so Gerald Fitzgerald the Younger had immediate possession of that manor.
[26] Dix, M.L., ‘The Fitzgerald’s of Queen’s County’, in Patrick Meehan (ed.), The Laois Millennium (Portlaoise, 2000), pp. 29-47, at p. 29
[27] Dix, M.L., ‘The Fitzgerald’s of Queen’s County’, in Patrick Meehan (ed.), The Laois Millennium (Portlaoise, 2000), pp. 29-47, at p. 30
[28] Dix, M.L., ‘The Fitzgerald’s of Queen’s County’, in Patrick Meehan (ed.), The Laois Millennium (Portlaoise, 2000), pp. 29-47, at p. 30
[29] Tallon, G. (ed.), Court of Claims: Submissions and Evidence 1663 (Dublin, 2006), no. 362
[30] Pender, S. (ed.), A Census of Ireland circa 1659 with essential materials from the Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661 (Dublin, 2002), p. 504

Saturday, September 7, 2019

The seneschals of Gascony 1216 to 1366


The seneschals of Gascony 1216 to 1366

Niall C.E.J. O’Brien

This listing of the seneschals of Gascony began many years ago with the idea of making a short biography on these individuals. Most of the seneschals for the period from 1216 to 1272 are from appendix IV of the Royal Letters of Henry III by Rev Walter Waddington Shirley (London, 1866) while others came from various sources. This piece was last updated on 30th October 2014 when I was distracted by other activities. In the meantime the world of the World Wide Web made a full listing of the seneschals of Gascony with a link to a biography on most of the individuals see = https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seneschal_of_Gascony


Reginald de Pontibus [to 22 December 1216] he resigned on 28 November 1216 but was still in office on 22 December. See Cal Doc Ire for more on this person

William, archbishop of Bordeaux [28 March 1217 – 7 May 1218]

Geoffrey Neville [8 May 1218 – November 1219] he was appointed in May 1218 and resigned in October or November 1219. He was not listed as being in office on 28 July 1220.

Philip de Ulecote [16 September 1220 – October 1220] he died in October 1220.

Hugh de Vivonia [4 January 1221 – 5 October 1221; 30 September 1231 – 23 May 1234] Hugh has occupied the job before he was formally appointed in January 1221 as a Patent Roll letter of 25 December 1220 styles him as seneschal. There is no end date for Hugh but his successor was appointed on 6 October 1221. Hugh second a second term after Henry de Trubbleville.

Savary de Mauleon [6 October 1221 – August 1224] he was in office on 2 August 1224 but later that month joined the king of France.

Richard, earl of Cornwall [23 March 1225 – October 1227] he was appointed by a special commission.

Henry de Trubbleville [19 October 1227 – 1 July 1231; 23 May 1234 – 1237; pre 28 November 1238 – pre 22 September 1241] he served three terms of office. His second successor was in office in September 1237 so Henry had to have left sometime in that year.
    In 1223 Henry received the escheated manor of Bradninch along with its honour in Devon worth £30 for his maintenance. In 1238 he was leader of a force of English knights assisting Frederick II at the siege of Brescia. Yet it was his service in Gascony which left him with large debts. In 1233 he granted Bradninch to Bernard Berenger, burgess of Pons for ten years but Henry’s bailiff continued to receive the issues until 1238. Henry died before 26 December 1239.  [Henry Summerson (ed.), Crown Pleas of the Devon Eyre of 1238 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, new series, vol. 28), no. 123]

Richard de Burgh [1 July 1231]: He was appointed in July 1231, but does not seem to have taken up the office. Hugh de Vivonia was appointed in successor to Trubbleville and not for Burgh.

Hubert Hoese [pre 7 September 1237 – pre 1 July 1238] He held office before he was formally appointed on 11 September 1237 and had vacated the job by July in the following year.

Rustan de Solers [22 September 1241 – 10 November 1242] He resigned in November 1242.

John Mansell [10 November 1242 – June 1244] He was appointed temporally in November 1242 and was only confirmed on 4 February 1243.

Nicolas de Molis [17 June 1244 – pre 13 July 1245] Nicolas had resigned before 13 July 1245. Nicholas first appears in 1230 when Henry III gave him the hundred manor of Diptford in Devon with the advowson of the church (value £10), along with Haytor and Stanborough hundreds (value £10) and holding all for half a knight’s fee. By 1249 Haytor hundred was valued at just 40s. At the Devon eyre of 1228 Henry was pardoned from money due to the crown and contributions to the county’s common fine. At the Devon eyre of 1238 Nicholas failed to appear or account for his warrant for the land. His son Roger also failed in 1281/2 to produce the warrant. His family had long held land in Devon with his ancestor Roger de Molis holding the manor of Teign George in 1086.
    Nicholas was sheriff of Devon between May 1234 and April 1236. At other times he was sheriff of Yorkshire and Hampshire along with warden of the Channel Islands. He carried one of the sceptres at the coronation of Queen Eleanor in 1236. [Henry Summerson (ed.), Crown Pleas of the Devon Eyre of 1238 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, new series, vol. 28), p. xlvii & nos. 596, 707, 749]

Map of Gascony by Zorian, circa 1150


William de Boell [16 July 1245 – 21 November 1247]

Drago de Barentyn [21 November 1247 – 7 September 1248; 18 March 1250 – 1255; pre 30 September 1260 – December 1260] he was appointed to succeed Boell as de Montfort was to succeed him.

Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester [7 September 1248 – March 1250]

Drago de Barentyn and Peter de Bordeaux [18 March 1250 – 1255] they were appointed joint seneschals in March 1250 and served for a period of time before Stephen Baucan took over in 1255.

Stephen Baucan [28 April 1255 – October 1255] He was appointed by Prince Edward.

Stephen Lungespee [23 October 1255 – December 1259] He was appointed in 1255 and was still in office in 1256, it is not clear if he stayed until 1259.

Bertrand de Cardaillac [22 December 1259 – September 1260] Bertnard was in office on 5 August 1260 while his successor was there by 30 September 1260. During that period he seems to be between jobs as he didn’t become first seneschal of Limoges until October the same year. Yet he wasn’t left in this job long as John de la Linde (Luidi) quickly succeeded him to Limoges.

John de Grelley [pre 10 January 1267 – post 5 March 1267]

Luke de Tony [5 June 1272 – no end date] He was appointed in June 1272 but we have not end date.

John de Haveringes, knight, seneschal of Gascony and constable of Bordeaux, (1306):
See pat rolls Edward 2 vol 1, p. 9

Guy Ferre, seneschal of Gascony (1308): see pat rolls Edward 2 vol 1, p. 83

John de Ferariis, seneschal of Gascony (1312): see pat rolls Edward 2 vol 1, p. 489

Anthony Pessaigne of Genoa: see more Gascony on this man at [cal patent rolls Edward 2, 1313-1317, p. 605] seneschal of Gascony in 1317 [cal patent rolls Edward 2, 1317-1321, p. 58] see more on this man at [Philomena Connolly (ed.), “List of Irish Entries on the Memoranda Rolls of the English Exchequer, 1307-27”, in Analecta Hibernica, no. 36 (1995), pp. 184, 189, 193, 196, 197]

William de Monte Acuto (Montagu): [1319] Sir William had been steward of the king’s household until the parliament of 1318 when he became the only important change of personal following Lancaster’s triumph. Bartholomew de Badlesmere took over his job as William was promoted to seneschal of Gascony. [14 century history page 55] He nominated Henry Beaufiz and John de Fayreford, parson of the church of Aston Clynton, to be his attorneys in England on his departure for Gascony in February 1319. [Cal. Pat. Rolls, 1317-1321, p. 311]
Paul Dryburgh & Brendan Smith, “Calendar of Ancient Deeds in the National Archives of the United Kingdom” in Analecta Hibernica, no. 39 (2006), pp. 58-59 = deeds between William Montagu, earl of Salisbury and Thomas earl of Norfolk

Sir Ralph Basset [1323] 14 century history page 109 = biography [George Edward Cokayne (ed.), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom (Alan Sutton, Gloucester, 1987), vol. ii, pp. 2, 3]

Oliver de Ingham [1335] Cal Pat Rolls, 1334-38, p. 123 protection for one year in England as he returns to Gascony after conferring with the king. As seneschal of Gascony he passed through Exeter in 1341-2 on his way to see the king. [Margery M. Rowe & John M. Draisey (eds.), The Receiver’s Accounts of the City of Exeter 1304-1353 (Devon & Cornwall Record Society, new series, vol. 32, 1989), p. 18] His daughter and co-heir (after 1349 sole heir), Joan married around 1351 Sir Miles de Stapleton of Bedale. Both were buried in Ingham priory as were some of their descendents. [George Edward Cokayne (ed.), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom (Alan Sutton, Gloucester, 1987), vol. v, p. 397] Biography on Oliver [George Edward Cokayne (ed.), The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom (Alan Sutton, Gloucester, 1987), vol. vii, pp. 58-60]

Thomas Cock []: By 1351 Thomas was described as a former seneschal of Gascony and current secretary to Henry, duke of Lancaster. In August 1351 he petitioned successfully for a benefice in the gift of Eynsham abbey for his clerk, Thomas Osger. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 218]

Nicholas de la Beche [1344]: Nicholas and his wife Margaret asked for a plenary remission at the hour of death and which was granted in April 1344. The following month they got to choose their final confessor and the right to use a portable altar. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 48, 52]

John de Higham [1344]: In October 1344 he got a benefice in the diocese of Lichfield on the representation of Henry of Lancaster, earl of Derby. In April 1360 he got permission to exchange his church of St. Gregory, Norwich diocese with the church of Derford, Lincoln diocese. Yet by June 1364 John was worried about his position as he was never ordained a priest and so got a dispensation for this oversight. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 78, 315, 501]

May 1347 Exemplification, at the request of Vitalis de Glayrak of Bayonne, of letters patent under the seal then used by the king, dated 5 March, 14 Edward III, granting to him in fee a plot of land in the water of Bayonne, called the island of 'Balay,' by the church of St. Bernard, Bayonne, at the rent of 5s of money current there. By King
Mandate to the seneschal of Gascony and the constable of Bordeaux to cause livery of the land to be made him pursuant to the said letters patent. [Cal Pat Rolls Edward 3 vol 7, p. 538]

John de Chevereston: In July 1348 he was captain of Calais and got papal permission with Ralph, bishop of Bath and William de Littelton, precentor of Wells that their confessors may give plenary absolution at the hour of death. In May 1361 the king agreed to pay de Chevereston as seneschal of Gascony, the sum of 2,460 marks for bills and wages with instructions to Master John de Stretlee, constable of Bordeaux to raise the money from various sources within Gascony. [Calendar Patent Rolls, Edward III, vol. 12, p. 18]
By 1362 John was seneschal of Aquitaine and cousin of the king. In that year his domestic chaplain, John Michel successfully asked for the canon of Abergwily with expectation of a prebend notwithstanding that he already had the church of Wotesdon in Lincoln. In June 1363 he successfully asked that William de Courtenay be ordained a priest and to study law in school for five years. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 135, 389, 425]

Thomas de Wetenalle [1366]: He was seneschal of Rodez (Guienne) and lord of Hoddestown, Hertfordshire and of Althorpe, Northants in 1366 when he asked to build two chapels of ease in both places. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 522-4]


Thomas de Felton: In September 1363 Edward, prince of Aquitaine and Wales successfully asked that Thomas, steward of his household be given a portable altar with his wife Joan. By April 1364 he was seneschal of Aquitaine and was granted a portable altar, initially for only ten years but later for life. [W.H. Bliss (ed), Calendar of Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Petitions to the Pope, vol. I, 1342-1419 (London, 1896), pp. 452, 484, 524-5]

In April 1375 the exchequer treasurer found that £7,098 14s 5d was owed to Thomas as seneschal of Gascony. He was paid 2,000 marks in part payment along with various revenues from the wool trade in various North Sea ports until the sum of 8,000 marks was paid with the remaining 648 marks 13d from the customs of Boston and London. [Cal Patent Rolls, Edward III, 1374-77, p. 93]

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